Campion Hall
Oxford

Campion Hall is the home of the Jesuit academic community in Oxford University.

The origins of Campion Hall begin in 1896 when the English Jesuits established a private hall in the University of Oxford. Fr Richard Clarke SJ was the first Master. The hall allowed Jesuits to study for Oxford degrees. The hall was granted permanent status in 1918. Originally in rented accommodation in St Giles, the architect Edwin Lutyens was commissioned to build a permanent home for the hall and the present building opened in 1935. The hall incoporates an ancient house (16th century) named after the brewer who built it, Micklem Hall. The street in which Campion Hall stands is Brewer Street. A new south wing was added in the 1960s and has recently been reincorporated for the use of the Campion Hall community.

Campion Hall accommodates a sizeable library and a significant art collection begun by Fr Martin D'Arcy SJ who was Master in the 1930s.

The community at Campion Hall consists of Jesuits from the UK and from around the world. Some teach in the University while others are studying, mostly for postgraduate degrees. Diocesan priests, members of other religious orders, and lay men and women, are also members of the Hall from time to time. Georgetown University in Washington DC has a permanent base at Campion Hall.

The Jesuit community is responsible for the University of Oxford Catholic Chaplaincy.

The Jesuit Institute is based at Campion Hall and some of its conferences are held here.

Campion Hall
Oxford
OX1 1QS

Travelling to Campion Hall

By Road
There is no parking available at Campion Hall and parking in the centre of Oxford is very restricted. You can park at the Westgate carpark which is very close to Campion Hall but will cost you around £30 for 28-hours. There are five good Park and Ride facilities: on the A34 and A44 coming into Oxford from the north; A420 from the west; A34/A4144 from the south; and A40 from the east. These sites are well signposted. Parking at the moment is free at some and costs £1.50 a day at others; the bus ride into town costs around £2.50.
Further Park and Ride information

By Rail
There are good rail links to Oxford. The station is about 10-minutes easy walk to Campion Hall.
Trainline

By Coach
There is a good coach service from London to Oxford. Coaches run every 10-minutes 24-hours a day.
Oxford Tube

By Air
The nearest airport is London Heathrow (LHR). Coaches run from Heathrow, and also from Gatwick (LGW), to Oxford every half-hour (or more frequently). The Airline Coach to Oxford starts at Stand 15 at Heathrow Central Coach Station and also calls at Stand 11 at Terminal 5. If you are arriving at Terminal 4, take the Heathrow Express train (free) to Terminal 3. Follow Terminal 3 signs to find the Central Bus Station. The journey to Oxford takes about 80-minutes. Get off at St Aldates (Brewer Street is a little further down the hill and across the road from the stop). The return ticket Heathrow-Oxford costs £26.
The Airline coach Heathrow/Gatwick to Oxford

Walking from the Station to Campion Hall

When you come out of the station you will see the ziggurat of the Said Business School opposite. Walk down the station approach and turn left along the front of the Said Business School. Across Frideswide Square ahead of you, you will the the Royal Oxford Hotel. Take the road that runs past the right-hand side of the hotel (Park End Street). Cross the river. And straight on into New Road, past the Castle mound on your right and Nuffield College on your left. Where the street bears right, keep going straight forward into the pedestrian area. Almost immediately turn right at BHS down St Ebbe's Street. Walk down St Ebbe's (St Ebbe's Church to your right) and past the back entrance to Pembroke College. Brewer Street is a very narrow street on your left (the road sign is probably obscured by the huge Kingerlee construction site). Campion Hall is about halfway down on the right (not the green door but the wooden door under the stone arch).

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